The New Bridges a.k.a. the Causeway at St Ives

This structure is a Grade II* Listed Building

The New Bridges also known as the Causeway and is part of London Road, St Ives in Cambridgeshire

The Causeway is a raised section of London Road once the main route south from St Ives in Huntingdonshire towards, as the name suggests, London. The Causeway is approximately 400 metres in length and is constructed largely from various types of brick of which there must be many thousands of them. The Causeway is open to traffic as far as the 'Bridgefoot' to provide access to the Dolphin Hotel and other riverside properties. There is however no vehicular access from the London Road Causeway into St Ives town centre. One can however, for a small fee, park in the Dolphin Hotel Car Park and take a short pleasant walk across the bridge over the River Great Ouse in the town.

The purpose of the Causeway is to provide a raised road surface over the southern flood plain of the River Great Ouse to allow pedestrians and traffic to reach the actual bridge over the river without getting their feet or wheels wet. The arches of the Causeway allow waters that has flooded onto the meadows on each side to pass underneath and rejoin the river on the south-eastern side.

The Causeway, also known as New Bridge, was built in 1822. Designed by Thomas. G. Elger of Bedford for the Bury-Stratton Turnpike Trust although it was actually owned by the Duke of Bedford. The 55 arches were originally constructed in yellow gault brick with a stone coping as a parapet but has since been repaired in various other types of brick.

The 'New' Bridges a.k.a The Causeway

The Causeway, part of London Road, St Ives in Cambridgeshire

The Causeway, part of London Road, a distant view from the Harrison Way bypass in St Ives in Cambridgeshire

 

Alongside the arches

Close up to the Causeway Arches at the town end of London Road, St Ives.

Close up to the Causeway Arches at the town end of London Road, in St Ives in Cambridgeshire

 

New Bridges from the Meadow

Alternative view of London Road Causeway in St Ives from the Meadow Footpath

Alternative view of the Causeway from the Meadow Footpath in St Ives in Cambridgeshire

 

Where the railway crossed the road

The red and blue bricks mark where the Cambridge to Huntingdon railway once crossed the Causeway

The red and blue brick section of the causeway, in the extreme right of the photo, marks where the railway between St Ives and Huntingdon once passed over a level crossing. The railway embankment and viaduct has long been removed.

 

Long awaited repairs

Repairs to the Causeway underway in July 2014

Repairs to the Causeway underway in July 2014

 

Underneath the arches

Underneath the arches

The clearance under the arches is deeper than one would image! This to allow for the great flow of water when the River Great Ouse is in full flood

 

River Great Ouse Flood Defences

This area underwent significant change with the construction of a new flood alleviation scheme (Autumn 2005).

 

Great Ouse Flood Protection Embankment

New (2005) flood protection around The Meadow on the banks of the River Great Ouse

The new flood protection embankment across The Meadow alongside the River Great Ouse at St Ives in Cambridgeshire