St Ives River Bridge, in St Ives

Bridge Street, St Ives,

Share this page on the Social Networks

Map Centre Position: Lat , Long . Map Zoom Level:

 

Email Contact for St Ives River Bridge

No email contact found
A picture of St Ives River Bridge in St. Ives, Huntingdonshire, Cambridgeshire

A picture of St Ives River Bridge

Printer friendly location map

Additional facilities available at St Ives River Bridge

Chapel of St Ledger (Chapel on the Bridge)

These additional facilities may have different opening times, follow link for details

Description of St Ives River Bridge at

Bridge Street, St Ives,

 

More information about the organisation that manages this location

 

This is a legally protected building of historic significance

This location is listed Grade 1 by English Heritage

 

St Ives began it's life as the village of Slepe in the later part of the 10th Century. Its location being probably due to it being the last reliable crossing of the River Great Ouse before the river reached the Great Fen. Slepe is derived from the Saxon word for muddy and this is down to the fact that there was no bridge at that time. If you wished to cross the river you got wet and if the name is anything to go by you got muddy too!

By the 11th Century Slepe was part of the estates of the Abbots of Ramsey and they set about turning their new possession into a money making venture. Travellers were focused upon the location owing to its river crossing, then a ford thought to have been situated roughly where the modern Church Street meets the river. At this point a town grew up to service the travellers and the boats plying trade upon the river. We must remember that in those days the rivers were equivalent to our modern motorways.

We are not sure when the first bridge was built but it was certainly in existance by 1107 and probably of timber construction. The provision of a crossing place where users did not get plastered in mud and soaking wet encouraged even greater use of the adjacent new town and its facilities.

Over the next few centuries the town grew even more and by the early 15th Century traffic both over and under the bridge had increased to a level where a timber bridge was insufficient and at some time prior to 1426 a stone bridge, much of which remains to this day was built.

The bridge then had 200 years of relative peace until the English Civil War when in 1645 the southern most arch of the bridge, near what is now the Dolphin Hotel, was destroyed and replaced by a drawbridge. The drawbridge was removed in 1716 and the arch replaced in stone and brick funded by the town's major landowner; Charles, 1st Duke of Manchester.

Note: The Chapel of St Ledger has its own information page on this site.

 

The Owner/Manager may Login and add products or services available from this location via their Control Panel

Additional high quality pictures relating to the St Ives River Bridge

You may click on the thumbnail images to see the full size version

St Ives Bridge over the River Great Ouse (E)

St Ives Bridge over the River Great Ouse (E)

 

The Chapel of St Ledger and the Bridge

The Chapel of St Ledger and the Bridge

 

Main arch of the St Ives River Bridge (E)

Main arch of the St Ives River Bridge (E)

 

St Ives Bridge over the River Great Ouse (W)

St Ives Bridge over the River Great Ouse (W)

 

Main arch of the St Ives River Bridge (W)

Main arch of the St Ives River Bridge (W)

 

St Ives River Bridgefoot (Southern)

St Ives River Bridgefoot (Southern)

 

St Ives River Bridgefoot (Northern)

St Ives River Bridgefoot (Northern)

 

Riverside Terrace at the Dolphin Hotel

Riverside Terrace at the Dolphin Hotel

 

A view of the bridge over tea and scones

A view of the bridge over tea and scones

 

Bridge Street in the 1900's

Bridge Street in the 1900's

 

The St Ives River Bridge in 1910

The St Ives River Bridge in 1910

 

A view from the St Ives Quay in 1900

A view from the St Ives Quay in 1900

 

The river bridge viewed from Holt Island

The river bridge viewed from Holt Island

 

Information Disclaimer

The information displayed on this page is not under the direct control of the owner/manager of this location and therefore may be out of date or incorrect. We aim to verify and update data displayed two or three times a year and at other times when the opportunity arises. If your use of this information is important we suggest you make direct contact with the owner/manager of the location before you rely upon it.